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Pain Control

Pain Control is a bespoke and unique pain management programme for people with long term conditions, persistent pain and syndromes such as fibromyalgia, and chronic spinal issues.

This programme is designed and run by Becky Robinson, a Chartered Physiotherapist with an Masters degree in Pain Science and Management, Becky is also a qualified Clinical Hypnotherapist. Pain Control assesses each individual holistically to see how we can best support them to gain control of their pain.

PAIN CONTROL 8 STEP APPROACH:

Our pain control programme is broken down into 8 steps, During your first appointment we will discuss each step in more detail.
Click on the highlighted sections to learn more

Medication Review

An important part of pain management is making sure your pain relief medication is right for your condition ( for example arthritic pain requires different medication to nerve pain), an adequate dosage, appropriately monitored and that you are not limited by any side effects. We liaise with GPs to find a balance of medication and other management strategies to support you the best.

1
Pacing

Pacing your activity is crucial in the management of long term pain. Think Goldilocks!
Too Hard: Activity Overload = increased pain
Too Soft: Activity Underload = increased pain
Just Right: Balance of activity = consistently and management of pain

2
Sleep

Sleep is an important part of maintaining a healthy mind and body. Sleep can effect mood, memory, concentration and energy/fatigue levels. Sleep is especially important in pain as not only as is it more likely to be disrupted in those experiencing pain, but also as lack of sleep is correlated to increased pain perception, decrease in pain tolerance and coping skills and higher levels of disability. A study in Turkey in 2014 that patients in chronic pain had almost double the problems with insomnia compared to those without pain. Establishing a good sleep routine and sleep hygiene patterns are essential.

3
Exercise

Exercising when you live with pain can be a tough prospect and finding a balance between building fitness and tolerance without exacerbating pain can be difficult. We can work together to find ways to make you more confident and comfortable when engaging in exercise. Remember exercise doesn’t have to mean joining a gym or covering yourself in lyrica, there are many ways to become active in day to day life, the key is finding what suits you. Keep it varied to stop getting bored, consistent to get into a routine, with friends or family to make it fun, ideally making it part of your every day life or even your work commute.

4
Stress & Anxiety

Stress is a useful part of our daily life, it keeps us alive! It helps deal with any perceived threats or danger, allowing us to get ready for action to fight or flee (escape) or freeze. It also helps us perform, exercise, compete and meet deadlines. Too little stress can leave us unmotivated, lethargic and unproductive. However too much can lead to overloading, overtraining, exhaustion and burnout. Extremes of either end of the scale are dangerous and can be harmful to our health and wellbeing. We can work to identify and manage triggers, to create a balance.

5
The Three A’s

Attention & Anticipation & Acceptance. There
are many experimental studies into how we provoke or stimulate pain and how we interpret,feel or behave in response to pain. Did you know that the brain can create a painful response in the anticipation of pain, even when no pain is present? Even suggestions of pain increasing or decreasing can change how we interpret pain. Equally the more attention we give pain, the more pain levels increase and tolerance can also decrease. Mindfulness, meditation, hypnosis, and distraction can be used as strategies to help improve a life living with pain.

6
Lifestyle

More and more research is being carried out on how environmental and lifestyle choices can effect health. Smoking, alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of exercise, long working hours and stress can all be detrimental to your health. They can all effect tissue healing, tendon health, immunity levels, fatigue, alter sensation and contribute to joint/muscle pain. Positive health changes such as exercise can help reduce our chances of developing cardiovascular disease, some forms of cancer, falls, dementia and depression. By looking at all aspects of our lifestyle we can help maintain health and prevent injury.

7
Learning & Creativity

Neuroplasticity can be considered the 'muscle building' part of the brain; the things we do often we become stronger at, and the things we don’t weaker. Neuroplastic changes to brain structure has been demonstrated when we learn, part of the structure of our brain (grey matter) also grows. How do we increase Neuroplastic changes? We stimulate the nervous system in a different way (as opposed to the pain activating stimulation), that engages adequate attention and intensity, involves learning and keep repeating until its reinforced. Novelty helps improve attention and stimulation, which is why creative tasks and activities are particularly useful.

(New+Novel+Learning+Attention) x Repeat = Neuroplastic changes

Brain Changing = Game changing

8
1
Medication Review

An important part of pain management is making sure your pain relief medication is right for your condition ( for example arthritic pain requires different medication to nerve pain), an adequate dosage, appropriately monitored and that you are not limited by any side effects. We liaise with GPs to find a balance of medication and other management strategies to support you the best.

2
Pacing

Pacing your activity is crucial in the management of long term pain. Think Goldilocks!
Too Hard: Activity Overload = increased pain
Too Soft: Activity Underload = increased pain
Just Right: Balance of activity = consistently and management of pain

3
Sleep

Sleep is an important part of maintaining a healthy mind and body. Sleep can effect mood, memory, concentration and energy/fatigue levels. Sleep is especially important in pain as not only as is it more likely to be disrupted in those experiencing pain, but also as lack of sleep is correlated to increased pain perception, decrease in pain tolerance and coping skills and higher levels of disability. A study in Turkey in 2014 that patients in chronic pain had almost double the problems with insomnia compared to those without pain. Establishing a good sleep routine and sleep hygiene patterns are essential.

4
Exercise

Exercising when you live with pain can be a tough prospect and finding a balance between building fitness and tolerance without exacerbating pain can be difficult. We can work together to find ways to make you more confident and comfortable when engaging in exercise. Remember exercise doesn’t have to mean joining a gym or covering yourself in lyrica, there are many ways to become active in day to day life, the key is finding what suits you. Keep it varied to stop getting bored, consistent to get into a routine, with friends or family to make it fun, ideally making it part of your every day life or even your work commute.

5
Stress & Anxiety

Stress is a useful part of our daily life, it keeps us alive! It helps deal with any perceived threats or danger, allowing us to get ready for action to fight or flee (escape) or freeze. It also helps us perform, exercise, compete and meet deadlines. Too little stress can leave us unmotivated, lethargic and unproductive. However too much can lead to overloading, overtraining, exhaustion and burnout. Extremes of either end of the scale are dangerous and can be harmful to our health and wellbeing. We can work to identify and manage triggers, to create a balance.

6
The Three A’s

Attention & Anticipation & Acceptance. There
are many experimental studies into how we provoke or stimulate pain and how we interpret,feel or behave in response to pain. Did you know that the brain can create a painful response in the anticipation of pain, even when no pain is present? Even suggestions of pain increasing or decreasing can change how we interpret pain. Equally the more attention we give pain, the more pain levels increase and tolerance can also decrease. Mindfulness, meditation, hypnosis, and distraction can be used as strategies to help improve a life living with pain.

7
Lifestyle

More and more research is being carried out on how environmental and lifestyle choices can effect health. Smoking, alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of exercise, long working hours and stress can all be detrimental to your health. They can all effect tissue healing, tendon health, immunity levels, fatigue, alter sensation and contribute to joint/muscle pain. Positive health changes such as exercise can help reduce our chances of developing cardiovascular disease, some forms of cancer, falls, dementia and depression. By looking at all aspects of our lifestyle we can help maintain health and prevent injury.

8
Learning & Creativity

Neuroplasticity can be considered the 'muscle building' part of the brain; the things we do often we become stronger at, and the things we don’t weaker. Neuroplastic changes to brain structure has been demonstrated when we learn, part of the structure of our brain (grey matter) also grows. How do we increase Neuroplastic changes? We stimulate the nervous system in a different way (as opposed to the pain activating stimulation), that engages adequate attention and intensity, involves learning and keep repeating until its reinforced. Novelty helps improve attention and stimulation, which is why creative tasks and activities are particularly useful.

(New+Novel+Learning+Attention) x Repeat = Neuroplastic changes

Brain Changing = Game changing

Prices & Booking:

If you are unsure what session is suitable for you please contact us

Pain Control

Initial Assessment
£52

60min

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Pain Control

Follow Up
£38

60min

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Clinical Hypnosis

Session
£49

60min

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